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Natural Remedies for Colds

Natural Remedies

Natural Remedies for Colds

What can we do to help our bodies through the process of healing a cold? Here are some natural remedies for your body and mind.

  • Rose hip tea is full of vitamin C and can help prevent colds.
  • Lemons, oranges and apple cider are all considered to be cold remedies.
  • For chills, take fresh gingerroot.
  • Historically, the layers of the onion were beieved to draw contagious diseases from the patient; onions were often hung in sick rooms. Today, we know that onions have antibacterial qualities.
  • Boil a whole onion, and after ward, drink the water. You can add a little butter and salt if the taste is unbearable!
  • Cut up fresh garlic cloves and add them to chicken soup or other foods, or swallow small chunks of raw garlic like pills.
  • Like onion and garlic, horseradish generates lots of heat to help offset colds. According to one farmer we know, a daily horseradish sandwich is the best cold rememdy out there!
  • Eat loads of hot and spicy foods like chili to clear the sinuses.
  • Prunes are rich in fiber, vitamins A and B, iron, calcium, and phosphorus. And they’ve been cured themselves!
  • To treat sore lips, go to bed with honey on them.
  • Troubled by cracked lips? Massage them with a dab of earwas (preferably your own!).

Home Remedies for Dry Skin

Winter’s low humidity and harsh conditions can do a number on your skin, leaving it flaky, itchy and dry as an old bone. If you don’t want to look like a desert tortoise, take a few precautionary measures.

  • As soon as you get out of the shower or tub, while your skin is still damp, slather on the moisturizing lotion.
  • Choose a lotion brand that has petroleum jelly or lanolin high on the ingredients list.
  • Don’t go outside in any season without using SPF of at least 30 on your face and hands.
  • Try adding lemon juice or vinegar to bath water. Soap, being highly alkaline, may make your skin feel itchy. We also have an e-book with more great tips for using lemons for natural remedies: Natural Beauty With Lemons
  • To soften dry skin, add 1-cup powdered milk to your bath. (It worked for Cleopatra.)
  • Avoid steaming hot water or lengthy immersions, which will strip your skin of its natural oils.

You may also enjoy tips to Clobber the Common Cold with Food from our friends over at FitnessandFreebies.com.
Fresh lemons

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January New Year Traditions

January

January New Year Traditions

January is named for the Roman god Janus, protector of gates and doorways. Janus is depicted with two faces, one looking into the past, the other into the future.

Puzzle of the Month of January

“Soon as I’m made, I’m sought with care, for one whole year consulted. That time elapsed, I’m thrown aside, neglected and insulted. What am I?” (Answer at the bottom of this post.)

New Year Traditions

Make Some Noise.

  • In ancient Thailand, guns were fired to frighten off demons.
  • In China, firecrackers routed the forces of darkness.
  • In the early American colonies, the sounds of pistol shots rang through the air.
  • Today, Italians let their church bells peal, the Swiss beat drums and North Americas sound sirens and party horns to bid the old year farewell.

Eat Something Special

Many New Year traditions concern food. Here are a few:

  • In the sountern United States, black-eyed peas and pork foretell good fortune.
  • Eating any ring0shaped treat (such as a donut) symbolizes “coming full circle” and leads to good fortune. In Dutch homes, fritters called olie bollen are served.
  • The Irish enjoy pastries called bannocks.
  • In India and Pakistan, rice promises prosperity.
  • Apples dipped in honey are a Rosh Hashanah tradition.
  • In Swiss homes, dollops of whipped cream, symbolizing the richness of the year to come, are dropped on the floors and allowed to remain there!

Drink a Beverage

Wassail Beverage
Although the pop of a champagne cork signals the arrival of the New Year around the world, some countries have their own traditions.

  • “Wassail,” the Gaelic term for “good health,” is served in some parts of England.
  • Spiced “hot pint” is the Scottish version of wassail. Traditionally, the Scots drank to each other’s prosperity and also offered this warm drink to neighbors along with a small gift.
  • In Holland, toasts are made with hot, spiced wine.

Give a Gift

  • New Year’s Day was once the time to swap presents.
  • Gifts of gilded nuts or coins marked the start of the new year in Rome.
  • Eggs, the symbol of fertility, were exchanged by the Persians.
  • Early Egyptians traded earthenware flasks.
  • In Scotland, coal, shortbread and silverware were traditionally exchanged for good luck.

Happy New Year!

P.S. Puzzle answer: An almanac!

You may also enjoy a small collection of New Year’s recipes from our friends over at FitnessandFreebies.com, which include more information on “Lucky Foods” and Black-Eyed Peas!

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Silent Night

Silent Night

Silent Night: The Story Behind the Song

Do you know the story behind the Christmas song, Silent Night? On Christmas Eve in 1818, Pastor Joseph Mohr had a problem: His church’s organ was broken. Worried about how to celebrate Christ’s birth without music, he found a poem he had written and brought it to his organist. The organist spontaneously put the words to music using his guitar. In just a few short hours, “Silent Night” was composed. If you’re feeling at a loss about something, find the song God has placed in your heart.

The Lyrics to Silent Night

[Verse 1]
Silent night, holy night!
All is calm, all is bright
Round yon Virgin, Mother and Child
Holy Infant so tender and mild
Sleep in heavenly peace
Sleep in heavenly peace

[Verse 2]
Silent night, holy night!
Shepherds quake at the sight
Glories stream from heaven afar
Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia!
Christ the Savior is born
Christ the Savior is born

[Verse 3]
Silent night, holy night!
Son of God, love’s pure light
Radiant beams from Thy holy face
With the dawn of redeeming grace
Jesus Lord, at Thy birth
Jesus Lord, at Thy birth

Mayda Mart wishes everyone a very safe and Merry Christmas!

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Clark Gable: Hunters’ Breakfast

Clark Gable

Clark Gable: Hunters’ Breakfast

Clark Gable was born in Cadiz, Ohio on February 1st. His parents were William H. and Adeline H. Gable, non-professional. Married to Carole Lombard, professional.

Clark Gable appeared on the stage in The Copperhead, Lady Frederick and Madam X. He was the winner of the Academy award as best actor of 1934 for his performance in It Happened One Night“.

Clark Gable’s many successes in the movie world are unparalleled. If interested, you can read his complete bio on IMDB.

Now we get to take a peak into his homestead and personal life with his contribution of a Hunters’ Breakfast

Clark Gable’s Hunters’ Breakfast

Every hunter should know how to prepare and cook his own birds and game. It’s the finishing touch to a day spent in the open, when you return home with an appetite as sharp as a razor. My specialty is doves. Here’s a recipe that is simple and sure fire, if you just follow the instructions. Of course, the first thing to do is to get your limit of doves. Sometimes it’s easier said than done, I Know.” – Clark Gable

First, pick the doves dry, put in boiling water and cook until tender. (Be careful; however, that the meat is firm and not cooked until it falls off the bones). While the doves are on the fire, prepare the sauce and cook the macaroni. The sauce goes like this:

Melt butter in a double boiler, stir in flour mixed with prepared mustard, add milk, stirring constantly, until the sauce is thickened to the right consistency. Toss in some chopped mushrooms and sliced hard boiled eggs.

Cook macaroni in boiling water until tender – drain in colander, pour cold water over macaroni until all the starcch is removed. Place doves on a heated platter and surround with the cooked macaroni. Pour white sauce over birds. Don’t get too much on the macaroni. It makes it soggy. Garnish with sprigs of parsley and pimento, if you feel ritzy. Serve with toasted, well-buttered French bread.

“I’ll have another helping, thanks.”

Hunters’ Breakfast Ingredients

  • 12 doves
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/3 cup mushrooms
  • 1 pound shell macaroni
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 hard-boiled eggs
  • Milk

Clark Gable Signature
Note: This recipe was a contribution from Clark Gable to a cookbook; however, the page was torn out and in a folder, so I’m afraid I don’t have the name of the cookbook. Feel free to let me know if you know! Thank you.

Clark Gable Movies Available on Mayda Mart

Thank you for visiting Mayda Mart.

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Gary Cooper Recipe: Buttermilk Griddle Cakes

Gary Cooper Recipe

Gary Cooper Recipe: Buttermilk Griddle Cakes

A Gary Cooper recipe; or, that is, one of his favorites from his mom.

Mr. Gary Cooper borrowed this recipe from his mother, Mrs. Charles Henry Cooper. These griddle cakes were a feature of the Cooper ranch in Montana.

Buttermilk Griddle Cakes Recipe

Griddle cakes made from buttermilk have an unusually good flavor and are more tender than those made with plain water or milk.

  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup sweet cream
  • 1 egg, well beaten
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • 2 tablespoons granulated cornmeal
  • 2 cups flour

Mix ingredients together in order given. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a greased, hot griddle. Cook on one side and when puffed, full of bubbles and well cooked on edges, turn and cook on other side.

Serve with butter and maple syrup.

Gary Cooper and His Mother

Gary Cooper Recipe from Mom

A Bit About Gary Cooper

Dad was a true Westerner, and I take after him“, Gary Cooper told people. Dad was Charles Henry Cooper, who left his native England at 19, became a lawyer and later a Montana State Supreme Court justice. In 1906, when Gary was 5, his dad bought a 600-acre ranch that had originally been a land grant to the builders of the railroad through that part of Montana. In 1910, Gary’s mother, who had been ill, was advised to take a long sea voyage by her doctor. She went to England and stayed there until the United States entered World War I. Gary and his older brother Arthur stayed with their mother and went to school in England for seven years. Too young to go to war, Gary spent the war years working on his father’s ranch. “Getting up at 5 o’clock in the morning in the dead of winter to feed 450 head of cattle and shoveling manure at 40 below ain’t romantic“, said the man who would take the Western to the top of its genre in High Noon (1952).

I think the most surprising trivia fact about Gary Cooper is the following:

In the early 1930s his doctor told him he had been working too hard. Cooper went to Europe and stayed a lot longer than planned. When he returned, he was told there was now a “new” Gary Cooper–an unknown actor needed a better name for films, so the studio had reversed Gary Cooper’s initials and created a name that sounded similar: Cary Grant.

Source: Gary Cooper Bio on IMDB

Gary Cooper Movies on Mayda Mart

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Katherine Hepburn Brownie Recipe

Katherine Hepburn

It’s fun to know a celebrity actually enjoyed a bit of baking! Following is a Katherine Hepburn brownie recipe as published in Ladies Home Journal in the year 1975.

These are rich and decadent, so a small square goes a long way in satisfaction and flavor!

Katherine Hepburn Brownies: The Recipe

First, melt two squares of unsweetened chocolate and 1/4 pound sweet butter (1 stick) in a heavy saucepan. Remove from heat and stir in 1-cup of sugar. Add 2 eggs along with 1/2-teaspoon real vanilla and beat like mad.

Stir in 1/4-cup flour, 1/4-teaspoon salt and a cup of chopped walnuts – not smashed up, you know, but just chopped into fairly good sized pieces.

Now mix all that up. Then you butter a square tin (8 x 8 inches) and dump the whole thing quickly into the pan. Stuff this pan into a pre-heated 325-degree oven for 40 minutes. After that, take out the pan and let it cool for awhile. Then cut into 1-1/2-inch squares and dive right in.

Food Editor’s Note: We tested this recipe in our Ladies Home Journal test kitchens, and it received accolades all around. Since you use only 1/4 cup flour (rather than the 1/2 or 3/4 cup ordinarily called for), the brownies have a wonderful pudding-like texture. In fact, if they are cut warm, you could almost eat them with a fork (which is no drawback, we assure you).

About Katherine Hepburn

Katherine Hepburn was an incredibly unique woman who forged her own path and her own destiny. Stories leaked out that she was haughty off-screen, but what it really amounted to, was that she refused to play the Hollywood game. She didn’t care to pose for pictures or gave interviews. She enjoyed wearing slacks and no make-up, being somewhat of a Tomboy. Hepburn’s story is interesting and rewarding – she always remained true to herself, not Hollywood.

To read more about her, check out her complete bio on IMDB.

Katherine Hepburn Movies on Mayda Mart

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Cary Grant Barbecue Chicken Recipe

Cary Grant Barbecue Chicken Recipe

Cary Grant Barbecue Chicken Recipe! An incredibly popular actor with an equally incredible background and amazing talent shared one of his favorite recipes.

“Now go to it, friends, and don’t blame me if it is not to your liking. For after all, the recipe is not mine. It is the national prize winner of the year and I happen to like it.” – Cary Grant

Cary Grant Barbecue Chicken Ingredients

  • 3 1-1/2 pound chickens
  • 1 cup tomato ketchup
  • 1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup A-1 sauce
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 1 clove garlic (chopped)

Instructions

Cut the chickens into serving pieces and brown in fat, using no flour. Salt and pepper to taste while cooking.

Then, combine one cup tomato ketchup, one-half cup Worcestershire sauce, one-half cup water, one-fourth cup A-1 sauce, one-fourth cup sugar, one-fourth cup cider vinegar, one chopped onion and one clove garlic chopped very fine.

After the chickens have been browned, place in a roaster, pour this sauce over them, cover and bake in a moderate oven (300 degrees) until tender. If the sauce needs thickening, add a little corn starch mixed with cold water and cook until starch is thoroughly done.

Photo of the original printing of this recipe with Cary Grant’s signature. Click to enlarge.

Cary Grant Barbecue Chicken Recipe

Did you know?

At the age of 15, Cary Grant ran away from home and joined Bog Penders acrobats, known in England as the “knockabout Comedians”.

Cary Grant Movies

I’ve gathered many of Cary Grant’s movies that are now in the public domain and offer them on DVD – and I’m always seeking out more. He was such fun to watch, no matter what type of role he played! Following is a list of what is currently available in my shop.

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Number Please 1920 Harold Lloyd Short

Number Please

Number Please 1920 Harold Lloyd Short

Stars of Number Please: Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Roy Brooks

Directors: Hal Roach, Fred C. Newmeyer (co-director) (as Fred Newmeyer)

Number Please is a fun, short comedy, with good material and a fine job by Harold Lloyd as a slightly amoral but still sympathetic character. Plenty on laughs as Lloyd goes to great limits to win the heart of a girl. Among the difficulties confronting Harold are a couple of contrary canines, several suspicious cops, a grossly incompetent telephone operator and a rapacious goat. The sequences involving the crazy mirrors and the phone booths are absolute gems.

Typical of many of the better silent slapstick comedies, Number Please is a highly entertaining, charming, and, simply put, FUNNY short. The gags are aplenty, and many of them take full creative advantage of the setting and the circumstances of the central characters. Taking place within the realms of an amusement park leads to many rather interesting cinematic moments.

Did you know?

Mildred Davis, who played the object of Harold’s affections in Number Please, was Harold Lloyd’s future real-life wife.

The location of the filming was an amusement park in Orange Park, California.

By the mid 1920’s, Harold Lloyd had left Roach and was producing all the films in which he starred. Of all the silent film comedians, Harold Lloyd was the most profitable. His films out grossed the movies of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton, and he made more films than both of them put together.

Movie Information

  • Country: USA
  • Language: English
  • Release Date: December 26th, 1920
  • Production Co.: Rolin Films
  • Run time: 25 minutes
  • Color: Black and White
  • Sound: Silent

You can watch this film for free on my BitChute channel. Just click the image below and it will take you there. Feel free to share! This movie is now in the public domain.

Hope you enjoy this old but still fun film and most of all, find a few grins and giggles!

 

Number Please

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Return of Draw Egan

Return of Draw Egan

The Return of Draw Egan Silent Movie

The Return of Draw Egan is an old, silent movie that is still quite entertaining to watch, especially if you’re into the older film-making, the great directors of that time and the acting that really took acting skills! If you’re new to old-time entertainment, give it a chance  –  it’s more entertaining than one would think.

The Return of Draw Egan is a 1916 silent era western drama motion picture starring William S. Hart, Louise Glaum, Margery Wilson, Robert McKim, and J.P. Lockney.

Hart plays Draw Egan, a bandit leader who narrowly escapes the long arm of the law thanks to some quick thinking and a secret trap door. His partner in crime, Arizona Joe (Robert McKim), is not so fortunate and is arrested.

The film takes place in the American Wild West that helped to form America. Draw Egan is a notorious outlaw (played by Hart). His gang is chased by a posse of lawmen to his remote mountain cabin, where they are trapped. During a fierce shootout, Egan opens a trapdoor and they escape through a tunnel before the posse can overwhelm them.

With a bounty on his head, Egan turns up in the dangerous frontier range town of Yellow Dog. Presenting himself by the assumed name William Blake, he enters the saloon. The seductive dance-hall girl, Poppy (played by Glaum), uses her alluring wiles to entice and entertain him. He looks amused when he is challenged to fight by a rowdy barfly, then punches and finishes the man off with the one powerful blow. The townspeople are impressed. Believing Blake to be a strong and law-abiding man, they want him to be their new marshal. The reformist mayor, Mat Buckton (played by Lockney), hires him for the much avoided position to restore law and order and rid the town of the lawless gunmen who have nearly taken over.

You can watch the entire movie free on my Bit Chute channel! The picture below is a link that will take you right to the movie. Check it out – you just might find you enjoy it!

The movie is public domain, which means you can (from BitChute), share it, torrent it or add it to a playlist.

Happy Labor Day!

Return of Draw Egan
Return of Draw Egan

 

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Making Hires Root Beer Homemade

Hires Root Beer Intro

Making Hires Root Beer Homemade

This is the original recipe for making Hires Root Beer. This recipe dates back to a brochure put out in the year 1891. Very vintage, very good! The typed recipe is slightly adapted, but you can download the original below in a PDF file, if you like.

Recipe Directions for Making Hires Root Beer

  1. Take contents of bottle (Root Beer Extract).
  2. 4 pounds of sugar (granulated is preferable).
  3. 5 gallons of pure fresh water (lukewarm is preferable).
  4. Half pint of good fresh yeast, or half cake of fresh compressed yeast.
  5. When made in cool weather, double the quantity of yeast should be used.

The Way to do It

Dissolve the sugar thoroughly in the water, then add the Root Beer Extract and the yeast. (If cake yeast be used, it should first be dissolved in a little cold water, then it will mix more readily with the beer.) Stir until thoroughly mixed, and bottle in strong bottles or jugs at once, corking and tying the corks securely. Then be sure and set in a warm place for several hours, so that it can become effervescent. (If set in a cool place when first made the yeast becomes chilled and cannot work).

It will be ready to drink after being bottled in ten or twelve hours, but will open more effervescently if allowed to stand for three or four days. After the Beer has become effervescent, it should then be set in a cool place of even temperature. Before opening the bottle place it on ice, or in a cold place, for a short time, when it will be sparkling and delicious.

To make the Hires Root Beer more cheaply, molasses or common sugar may be used to sweeten it.

A very pleasant drink may be made for immediate use by adding two teaspoonfuls of the Extract to a quart of water, sweetening with granulated sugar to suit the taste, then beat half the white of an egg and mix together.

Note. Occasionally parties write us that they have tried to make the Root Beer, and while it is very good, it does not effervesce, or pop, when it is opened.

Now, when a case of this kind happens, we know that there is something wrong in the making of it. Either the yeast was not good, or else the Beer, when made, was placed in the cellar, or in a cool place, where it became shilled and could not ferment.

A woman in making bread is always very careful that the dough does not become chilled, so sets it in a warm place to insure its rising and becoming light. So it is with our Root Beer, warmth is essential to life. If this simple fact is borne in mind no one will ever fail in making our Root Beer to have it delicious and sparkling.

When we say, “fresh compressed yeast,” we mean the small square cake yeast that is sold fresh every day in most of the prominent towns of the United States at two cents a cake. When only the dry cake yeast can be had, a whole cake should be used. In fact, our experience has been that very little of the dry cake yeast sold is good for anything; we therefore prefer to use good fresh baker’s yeast, or fresh compressed yeast.

If these simple hints are carefully borne in mind the Hires Root Beer is very little trouble to make successfully.

When we say “yeast”, we do not mean baking powder.

THE CHARLES E. HIRES CO.,
SOLE MANUFACTURERS, PHILADELPHIA, PA

Cooking and Baking with Root Beer Root Beer Recipes Cookbook

Once you’ve made a batch of homemade Hires Root Beer, discover many tasty ways to use it in your cooking and baking with our Root Beer Recipes eBook!

Click the image below to download a copy of the page that contained the original publication of “Making Hires Root Beer”.

Hires Root Beer