Posted on

Number Please 1920 Harold Lloyd Short

Number Please

Number Please 1920 Harold Lloyd Short

Stars of Number Please: Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Roy Brooks

Directors: Hal Roach, Fred C. Newmeyer (co-director) (as Fred Newmeyer)

Number Please is a fun, short comedy, with good material and a fine job by Harold Lloyd as a slightly amoral but still sympathetic character. Plenty on laughs as Lloyd goes to great limits to win the heart of a girl. Among the difficulties confronting Harold are a couple of contrary canines, several suspicious cops, a grossly incompetent telephone operator and a rapacious goat. The sequences involving the crazy mirrors and the phone booths are absolute gems.

Typical of many of the better silent slapstick comedies, Number Please is a highly entertaining, charming, and, simply put, FUNNY short. The gags are aplenty, and many of them take full creative advantage of the setting and the circumstances of the central characters. Taking place within the realms of an amusement park leads to many rather interesting cinematic moments.

Did you know?

Mildred Davis, who played the object of Harold’s affections in Number Please, was Harold Lloyd’s future real-life wife.

The location of the filming was an amusement park in Orange Park, California.

By the mid 1920’s, Harold Lloyd had left Roach and was producing all the films in which he starred. Of all the silent film comedians, Harold Lloyd was the most profitable. His films out grossed the movies of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton, and he made more films than both of them put together.

Movie Information

  • Country: USA
  • Language: English
  • Release Date: December 26th, 1920
  • Production Co.: Rolin Films
  • Run time: 25 minutes
  • Color: Black and White
  • Sound: Silent

You can watch this film for free on my BitChute channel. Just click the image below and it will take you there. Feel free to share! This movie is now in the public domain.

Hope you enjoy this old but still fun film and most of all, find a few grins and giggles!

 

Number Please

Posted on

Return of Draw Egan

Return of Draw Egan

The Return of Draw Egan Silent Movie

The Return of Draw Egan is an old, silent movie that is still quite entertaining to watch, especially if you’re into the older film-making, the great directors of that time and the acting that really took acting skills! If you’re new to old-time entertainment, give it a chance¬† –¬† it’s more entertaining than one would think.

The Return of Draw Egan is a 1916 silent era western drama motion picture starring William S. Hart, Louise Glaum, Margery Wilson, Robert McKim, and J.P. Lockney.

Hart plays Draw Egan, a bandit leader who narrowly escapes the long arm of the law thanks to some quick thinking and a secret trap door. His partner in crime, Arizona Joe (Robert McKim), is not so fortunate and is arrested.

The film takes place in the American Wild West that helped to form America. Draw Egan is a notorious outlaw (played by Hart). His gang is chased by a posse of lawmen to his remote mountain cabin, where they are trapped. During a fierce shootout, Egan opens a trapdoor and they escape through a tunnel before the posse can overwhelm them.

With a bounty on his head, Egan turns up in the dangerous frontier range town of Yellow Dog. Presenting himself by the assumed name William Blake, he enters the saloon. The seductive dance-hall girl, Poppy (played by Glaum), uses her alluring wiles to entice and entertain him. He looks amused when he is challenged to fight by a rowdy barfly, then punches and finishes the man off with the one powerful blow. The townspeople are impressed. Believing Blake to be a strong and law-abiding man, they want him to be their new marshal. The reformist mayor, Mat Buckton (played by Lockney), hires him for the much avoided position to restore law and order and rid the town of the lawless gunmen who have nearly taken over.

You can watch the entire movie free on my Bit Chute channel! The picture below is a link that will take you right to the movie. Check it out – you just might find you enjoy it!

The movie is public domain, which means you can (from BitChute), share it, torrent it or add it to a playlist.

Happy Labor Day!

Return of Draw Egan
Return of Draw Egan

 

Posted on

Bette Davis Classic Movies

Bette Davis

Bette Davis Classic Movies

Bette Davis made so many wonderful classic movies dating back to the 1930s. She was an incredible, unique actress, an exceptional claim to fame all her own. She was good at being bad, both in movies and in her day-to-day life!

While in many ways Bette Davis could appear bigger than life, she was also vulnerable in her own ways, just like any one of us. She described the last three decades of her life as a “my macabre period“. She hated being alone at night and found growing older “terrifying”. I should think many of us relate to those feelings. During her life, she spent the majority of her wealth supporting her mother, three children, and four husbands.

She was amazing, sassy, tough and lovable all at the same time – not to mention a real treat to watch, no matter her role.

Quotes From Bette Davis

  • I wouldn’t piss on Joan Crawford if she were on fire.
  • Getting old is not for sissies.
  • What a fool I was to come to Hollywood where they only understand platinum blondes and where legs are more important than talent.
  • To fulfill a dream, to be allowed to sweat over lonely labor, to be given a chance to create, is the meat and potatoes of life. The money is the gravy.
  • I don’t know what’s wrong with me, but I think I just can’t play myself. I don’t know how! But, if you give me a drink – give me a cigarette – give me a gun – I’ll play any old bag you want me to. I just can’t play myself!
  • The weak are the most treacherous of us all. They come to the strong and drain them. They are bottomless. They are insatiable. They are always parched and always bitter. They are everyone’s concern and like vampires they suck our life’s blood.

The above quotes (and many more), along with the entire bio of Bette Davis can be found on IMDB.

Bette Davis Movies

Available by Request

  • 1934 – Fog Over Frisco
  • 1936 – The Golden Arrow
  • 1938 – The Sisters
  • 1941 – The Great Lie
  • 1932 – The Rich Are Always With Us
  • 1943 – Watch on the Rhine
  • 1946 – Deception
  • 1948 – Winter Meeting
  • 1949 – Beyond the Forest
  • 1950 – All About Eve
  • 1956 – Catered Affair
  • 1965 – The Nanny

 

Thank you for visiting Mayda Mart.

Posted on

Joel McCrea Movies Westerns and More

Joel McCrea

Joel McCrea Movies Westerns and More

Joel McCrea movies spanned far more than Westerns – and he was good at every role he played!

Joel McCrea was one of the great stars of American Westerns, and a very popular leading man in many non-Westerns as well. He was born November 5, 1905, and raised in the surroundings of Hollywood – South Pasadena to be precise. He grew to become 6-feet 2-inches tall! He had a full and successful career in movies and was one of the rare actors who had a good heart, and knew how to pass that goodness on, even while he played a tough cowboy on screen. He passed on October 20, 1990 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California.

By the late Nineteen-Forties, Joel McCrea Movies were mostly focused on Westerns. He made few non-Westerns thereafter. He was immensely popular in them, and most of them still hold up well today.

Joel McCrea Historical Facts

  • Inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 1969.
  • Joel McCrea was infamously modest about his own acting abilities, often bordering on a soft-spoken contempt.
  • He was married for 57 years to actress Frances Dee, who survived him.
  • He was regarded as one of the two best riders in Western films along with Ben Johnson, who had been a real cowboy.
  • McCrea raised his own horses, was a passionate outdoors man and large-scale rancher, invested wisely in livestock and real estate, was a staunch Republican and frugal millionaire.
  • Joel McCrea was a true boy scout – can you just imagine what he’d think of that organization today – allowing girls and those who think they’re girls?
  • He died on his 57th wedding anniversary.
  • McCrea met the real Wyatt Earp in Hollywood in 1928 and ended up playing the iconic lawman in 1955’s Wichita.” He later played Bat Masterson in “The Gunfight at Dodge City” in 1959.
  • McCrea admitted late in life that he made much more money in real estate investments than he ever did in movies.

Source of above Historical Facts: IMDB.

Joel McCrea Quote

“I always felt so much more comfortable in the Western. The minute I got a horse and a hat and a pair of boots on, I felt easier. I didn’t feel like I was an actor anymore. I felt like I was the guy out there doing it.” (1978)

Joel McCrea Movies Available

Note: Movies that are linked to can be purchased directly from the site. Movies with no link can be purchased by request. You would be sent an invoice for payment. In your request email, simply state the movie title you would like and if you prefer to be invoiced via PayPal or Stripe.

Joel McCrea Memorial Photo

Posted on

Doris Day Movies

Doris Day Movies

Doris Day Movies

Doris Day movies will all tell you that Doris Day’s acting couldn’t help but make you smile! She was always upbeat, lit up the screen with her brilliant smile and had a “spunky” way about her that was difficult not to like! From her expressions to her body language, she proved herself to be one great actress. Never mind the fact that she could sing and dance, too.

Doris Day Movies From the Beginning

Her first starring movie role was in Romance on the High Seas (1948). The next year, she made two more films, My Dream Is Yours (1949) and It’s a Great Feeling (1949). Audiences took to her beauty, terrific singing voice and bubbly personality, and she turned in fine performances in the movies she made (in addition to several hit records). She made three films for Warner Bros. in 1950 and five more in 1951. In that year, she met and married Martin Melcher, who adopted her young son Terry, who later grew up to become Terry Melcher, a successful record producer.

In 1953, Doris starred in Calamity Jane (1953), which was a major hit, and several more followed: Lucky Me (1954), Love Me or Leave Me (1955), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) and what is probably her best-known film, Pillow Talk (1959). She began to slow down her film making pace in the 1960s, even though she started out the decade with a hit, Please Don’t Eat the Daisies (1960).

Did You Know?

  1. It was during the location filming of The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) when she saw how camels, goats and other “animal extras” in a marketplace scene were being treated that began her lifelong commitment to preventing animal abuse.
  2. Doris Day did not like profanity. (Smart lady!) As a recording artist, she would require anyone who swore to put a quarter in a “swear jar“. In addition, she does not allow her songs to be used in movies that contain swear words.
  3. Doris Day is a staunch supporter of the Republican Party. Due to the nature of hatred and filth in Hollywood, she practices the old but respectful practice of “Silence is King” in matters such as this.
  4. After her Pillow Talk (1959) co-star Rock Hudson died of AIDS in 1985, Day told the press that she had never known he was a homosexual.
  5. Doris Day’s childhood idol was Ginger Rogers, with whom she starred in Storm Warning (1951).
  6. Doris Day briefly dated Ronald Reagan – with whom she co-starred in Storm Warning (1951) and The Winning Team (1952) – shortly after his divorce from Jane Wyman when she and Reagan were contract players at Warner Brothers.
  7. Her dreams of a dancing career were dashed when a car accident on October 13, 1937, badly damaged her legs. Doris Day spent most of her teenage years wheelchair-bound and during this time began singing on the radio.
  8. Doris Day underwent a hysterectomy during the filming of Julie (1956) after being diagnosed with a tumor the size of a grapefruit that was growing into her intestines.
  9. Doris Day’s only child, Terry Melcher, died of melanoma on November 19, 2004, aged 62.
  10. [2014 quote from Doris Day] “Would you believe I’m still offered scripts and projects all the time? Every once in a while I think about working again, but they don’t make the kind of movies I made anymore! It’s a different world.”

Source of above trivia: IMDB

Doris Day – definitely a great role model.

If interested in some of her movies, I can do a custom order for you for any of the following (use my contact form to let me know what you’d like and we’ll go from there).

Chronological, by year, list of Doris Day movies.

  • 1948 – Romance on the High Seas
  • 1949 – It’s a Great Feeling
  • 1949 – My Dream is Yours
  • 1950 – Storm Warning
  • 1950 – Tea For Two
  • 1950 – The West Point Story
  • 1950 – Young Man With a Horn
  • 1951 – I’ll See You In My Dreams
  • 1951 – Lullaby of Broadway
  • 1951 – On Moonlight Bay
  • 1951 – Starlift
  • 1952 – April In Paris
  • 1952 – By the Light of the Silvery Moon
  • 1952 – The Winning Team
  • 1953 – Calamity Jane
  • 1954 – Young At Heart
  • 1955 – Love Me or Leave Me
  • 1955 – Lucky Me
  • 1955 – The Man Who Knew Too Much
  • 1956 – Julie
  • 1957 – Teachers Pet
  • 1957 – The Pajama Game
  • 1958 – The Tunnel Of Love
  • 1959 – It Happened to Jane
  • 1959 – Pillow Talk
  • 1960 – Midnight Lace
  • 1960 – Please Don’t Eat the Daisies
  • 1962 – Billy Rose’s Jumbo
  • 1962 – That Touch of Mink
  • 1963 – Lover Come Back
  • 1963 – Move Over, Darling
  • 1964 – Send Me No Flowers
  • 1965 – Do Not Disturb
  • 1966 – The Glass Bottom Boat
  • 1967 – Caprice
  • 1967 – The Ballad of Josie
  • 1967 – The Thrill of it All
  • 1968 – With Six You Get Eggroll

Doris Day, Age 95

Doris Day Age 95